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Brexit and the Irish Border: A Warning to the Workers’ Movement

On March 29th 2019 the United Kingdom is scheduled to leave the European Union. For seventeen months the British government and the EU negotiators have been struggling to reach a legally binding “withdrawal agreement” to govern the terms of UK withdrawal, including the “divorce bill” or the sum the UK pays to settle its obligations to the EU, and a “political declaration” outlining the basic shape of a final deal after further negotiations.
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Planet, not profit – socialist solution to climate crisis needed

While Trump's climate change denial is now close to unique among world leaders, capitalism is fundamentally incapable of dealing with this crisis, as profit – the system's motor force – must come before all else. Based as it is upon competition between corporations and nation states for profits and dominance, it is incapable of realising the co-ordinated, structural transformation in our economy and infrastructure needed, particularly serious action to end our reliance upon fossil fuels.
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A Contested Past: Dealing with the Legacy of The Troubles

Socialists have no confidence in the capacity of the sectarian forces and the state to subject their role in the troubles to real scrutiny. We do however have a confidence in working class people to expose the truth and expose these forces to real scrutiny. This could means some form of wide-ranging enquiry into the troubles, which would not be in the hands of the state or establishment parties but made up of respected trade unionists and those with a record of campaigning on these issues from the stand point of ordinary people, including human rights groups.
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Derry Girls: Laughter and tears of working-class life during Troubles

It’s fair to say that the Channel 4 hit Derry Girls, which was commissioned for a second series after its first episode, had us all in laughter and tears by the end of it. The series is set in Derry, a “troubled little corner of the world” as Erin puts it, with the backdrop of the Troubles. It follows a group of teenage girls and a “wee English fella” as they grapple with teenage angst and all the fun that comes along with it in the context of sectarian conflict and steeped in nineties nostalgia.