Sudan: Mohamed Satti released – global solidarity campaign gets results!

The campaign to release Mohammed Satti (Hamudi) by the CWI has been successful. Below we publish a statement from the CWI (Committee for a Worker’s International). 

CWI Sudanese comrade, Mohammed Satti (Hamudi), was released yesterday night, Thursday 2 February. He was detained by the state for over two weeks for his participation in an anti-regime demonstration in the capital, Khartoum. Hamudi was brought home by a police car at around 9.30pm local time.

There is no doubt that Hamudi’s release is the fruit of the relentless pressure put on the Sudanese authorities by the international campaign of solidarity organised by the CWI and its sections around the world. The growing public noise over Hamudi’s case meant that keeping him detained became a liability for the Sudanese government.

The CWI salutes this victory over the Sudanese State, and wishes to thank all those who have campaigned to get Hamudi out of prison. However, dozens of opposition activists are still detained in terrible conditions by the regime, and need to be released too. As protests against price hikes broke out again on Wednesday, in Khartoum, Wad Medani, Zalingei and other cities, more protesters were arrested. This highlights the need for a sustained movement that can not only resist state repression in Sudan, but that can uproot the capitalist dictatorship of Omar al Bashir. The CWI demands freedom for all political prisoners fighting the Sudanese regime, and will continue to campaign and help build the struggle of the Sudanese people for a free, democratic and socialist Sudan.

Visit socialistworld.net for more information on this campaign and for more socialist analysis from around the world.

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