Victoria Primary School latest victim of Assembly cuts

East Belfast Socialist Party spokesperson and education worker Tommy Black today attacked Minister Caitriona Ruane after revealing that promised new school buildings in East Belfast will now be scrapped. The decision by the Minister to scrap plans to build a much needed new building at Victoria primary school is a slap in the face for the local community. Assembly cuts have already led to the closure of Beechfield Primary School, the closure of Ballymacarratt Library, funding cuts to the Playzone facility at Ballymac Community Centre and also the scrapping of new buildings at Strandtown Primary school.

These cuts are an attack on working class communities. Education is already seriously underfunded. Schools special needs budgets, IT support and deteriorating buildings all reflect a history of neglect.

Jobs and services in our education system must be defended. Parents, teachers, staff and young people must unite to fight for the resources that are needed to properly fund our schools. Communities in East Belfast need to get organised to fight the cuts. There should be no mistake made, the blame for these cuts lies squarely with the parties in the Assembly Executive. They voted through these cuts and they need to be confronted with mass opposition.

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