Tommy Black for the Assembly and Belfast City Council

  Tommy Black is a long-standing trade unionist and socialist who has been a consistent opponent of cuts in East Belfast. Tommy works as a building supervisor at Ashfield Girls High school, where he also represents staff as a NIPSA shop steward. He is the vice-chair of NIPSA education Branch 516 and is an elected member of the Public Officers Group Executive of NIPSA.

Tommy has fought against cuts to services as a community activist in East Belfast and played a key role in organizing the anti-water charges We Won’t Pay Campaign, speaking at countless meetings and challenging the lies of Government spokepersons that we don’t pay for water. Tommy was the only candidate to speak out against the closure of Sydenham House Women’s Refuge Centre and has been a vocal opposition to the politician’s role in cutting funding to Ballymac Playzone.

Tommy is currently the East Belfast organizer of the Stop the Cuts Campaign.

Tommy told socialistpartyni.net: “I am standing for Belfast City Council and the Assembly so ordinary working class people have a real choice – a choice between electing sectarian and right-wing politicians who have abandoned the people of East Belfast politicians and electing a worker who will represent the interests of working people and the unemployed.

“East Belfast has been hit hard with major job losses. There is a major housing crisis in East Belfast as social housing has been sold off to landlords, in the process pushing housing prices to unattainable levels. The politicians on the Council and in Stormont are completely out of touch with these issues. I pledge not to live on the inflated salaries and allowances of the Assembly politicians, but to only take a workers wage, and donate the rest of my salary to the assisting workers in struggle and the development of a socialist alternative to organize and represent working class people.”

Tommy is standing for Belfast City Council in the Pottinger ward
Tommy is also standing for the Assembly in East Belfast
If you would like to assist in Tommy’s election campaign contact 02890232962

 

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And 2 letters about Connolly and Religion

The real ideas of James Connolly


An article by Peter Hadden which appeared in Socialism Today, theoretical journal of the SP in England/Wales was followed by 2 letters on Connolly and Religion, issues 100, 102-103.

James Connolly was a Marxist, a revolutionary socialist and an internationalist. On the ninetieth anniversary of his execution, Peter Hadden reviews his life of unremitting struggle to advance the interests of the working class and overthrow the existing social order.

In 1910 James Connolly concluded his pamphlet, Labour, Nationality and Religion, in the simplest and most straightforward terms: "The day has passed for patching up the capitalist system, it must go". Ninety years after his death it is necessary to begin any true account of James Connolly’s life with reminders of what he really believed in, what he really fought for.

 

After the Omagh Bomb

October 1998

AN UNPRECEDENTED wave of anger and revulsion has swept across Northern Ireland in the aftermath of the Omagh bomb. In Omagh virtually everything shut down for a week as the town braced itself for the agony of the funerals.

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