Stop these savage cuts

Support the socialist alternative “What I say to people on the doorstep is we will only cut your throat slowly, the others will cut your head off” was a comment of New Labour MP for Blyth Valley in the North East, Ronnie Campbell, in a local paper. This message has been mirrored by New Labour chancellor Alistair Darling, when he admitted that public sector cuts will be ‘deeper and tougher’ than under the hated Tory regime of Margaret Thatcher.

This is the best a New Labour government is offering workers facing an uncertain future, that they will kill you more slowly than either a Tory or LibDem government. An increasing number of workers are drawing the conclusion that New Labour, Tories and LibDems are now nothing more than carbon copies of each other.

They are all offering a diet of cuts, cuts and more cuts. All of them are gearing up for ferocious attacks on public services.
Stop these savage cuts: support the socialist alternative

The economy generally is showing signs of an extremely fragile and maybe temporary recovery but one commentator forebodingly remarked that “the starting gun has been fired on a public sector recession that is likely to last for several years”. According to the research institute, Centre for Cities, 290,000 public sector jobs could go by 2014, and the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development goes further and says that over 500,000 public sector jobs will be axed.

In the North East we have the biggest percentage of workers working in the public sector of any region. That level of attack on the public sector will hit the North East like a hammer blow.

But while the big three parties tell working people to tighten our belts and brace ourselves for austerity measures, it’s a different story for the bosses and bankers whose free market mess got us into this situation. This recession is hitting the shop-floor not the boardroom!

Tesco boss, Sir Terry Leahy, gets a massive 900 times more than an average Tesco worker. A hundred bankers from the bailed out RBS bank received bonuses of at least £1 million last year – that’s more than many workers will earn in a lifetime.

All of this at a time when workers, such as redundant Corus workers from Teesside, are facing a bleak and uncertain future. It’s champagne and caviare for the bosses, bread and water for redundant workers.

In Gateshead and Redcar two Socialist Party members, myself and Hannah Walter, are standing as general election candidates as part of the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition (TUSC). We are standing alongside other candidates in TUSC throughout Britain who have a proven track record of fighting cuts and privatisation.

Also, Socialist Party candidates have pledged to only take the average wage of a worker if elected. We are standing to give a fighting alternative to workers facing the knife being wielded by the three establishment parties.

 

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Cameron turns back clock on women's rights

Next Article

Tax cuts for the rich – water charges for ordinary people

Related Posts

Bradford murders and prostitution

The murder of three women in Bradford once again draws attention to the plight of women who take up prostitution. Money for rent, to pay off debts, sometimes a better income than many jobs pay and often addiction to drugs and alcohol are some of the reasons that women (and men) turn to prostitution.

Egypt, Portugal, Spain… Youth Revolt Against Capitalism

With towering levels of unemployment, education cuts and (for those lucky to find work) squeezing of already adequate wages, young people are being hit hardest by the recession. Whilst the percentage of young people aged 18-24 officially unemployed in Northern Ireland rises above 17% (a further 62,000 16-18 year olds are unemployed) the Tory/Lib Dem coalition government continues to spend approximately £2million pounds a day on bombing Libya rather than creating jobs for young people.

Thailand – Red-shirt supporters invade parliament

Thousands demand dissolution as political crisis deepens

The BBC World Service has reported that on Wednesday 6 April, “Thousands of Thai anti-government protesters - known as "red-shirts" – [have] marched on parliament, amid high political tension in Bangkok. The red-shirts forced MPs to call off a session and some breached security to enter parliament’s grounds…”

China – Women’s struggle then and now

There are important lessons from women’s struggle in Chinese history that should be studied again

International Women’s Day was celebrated for the first time in China in 1924. By then, growing workers’ and women’s movements were already developing. The Hunan Women’s League was formed in 1921. By the end of that year they had pushed through provisions on women’s suffrage and personal freedom in Hunan’s constitution. The Association for Women’s Rights in Zhejiang province issued an appeal for women to join the revolution to overthrow the warlords and introduce democracy. In Shanghai, 20,000 workers in the silk spinning industry went on strike in 1923 demanding a 10-hour day and wage increases. Chen Pi-lan, who became a Trotskyist, was one of the leaders of the Communist Party Women’s League in Shanghai.