Stop the health cuts

Patients with infectious diseases side-by-side with surgical patients, wards grossly understaffed, single – use equipment being used on many patients – even a lack of rubber gloves! No, this is not a description of conditions in hospitals in a poor African country, but reports that we have heard from NHS staff right here in Northern Ireland!

Perhaps this should come as little surprise after the recent revelations of conditions at Stafford Hospital in England. Under pressure from local campaigners, an inquiry was launched by the Healthcare Commission which found that up to 1,200 people died unnecessarily at the hospital from 2005-2008. It was made clear this was because management consistently put cost-cutting over patient-care. The government know that this is not an isolated case but reflects an endemic problem in the NHS, so they are resisting calls for a full, public inquiry.

Serious cuts are already hitting the health service here, thanks to the Assembly Executive’s demand for efficiency savings. At the Royal Hospitals, 20 beds have been stripped from maternity, meaning women who have an “uneventful” birth will be kicked out four hours later! As the Socialist Party has exposed, rehabilitation services are being cut by two-thirds. At the City Hospital, the Regional Ear, Nose & Throat unit is under immediate threat. Scandalously, the Belfast HSC Trust is cutting 58 acute mental inpatient beds from an already overstretched service at a time when tens of thousands of people face unemployment and financial pressure, factors which undermine mental health.

These are just a few examples. Of course, these cuts in services have been accompanied by the loss of 2,500 health workers in the Belfast area, throwing more people on the scrap heap. This pattern is being replicated across Northern Ireland. Much worse is set to come, with £113 million being cut from the health budget this year. The most vulnerable in our society will suffer the most.

The Health Minister, Michael McGimpsey, has tried to publicly portray himself as being opposed to the cuts. This is meaningless posturing. His party, the UUP, and all the other main parties are signed up to this budget which slashes public services. If he was really opposed to the cuts, he would resign and mobilise the community to fight back. Local councillors are also complicit in the cuts, with Tom Hartley of Sinn Fein, who sits on the Belfast Trust board, doing nothing to raise awareness or build opposition to the attacks, which the Socialist Party has challenged him to justify.

Last year, 15 top civil servants in the Department of Health earned over £1.4 million in wages and bonuses – presumably for being “efficient” in slashing people’s essential services! More fundamentally, a huge amount of the NHS budget flows into the profits of big business; pharmaceutical giants who charge extortionate prices, construction firms who suck the service dry through PFI/PPP schemes, cleaning contractors who pay poverty wages while delivering an inferior service.

Workers and the community can fight back! The health service unions, with millions of members, can potentially play a crucial role in such a campaign. Unfortunately, the right-wing leaderships of unions like Unison seem more interested in helping management cover up the attacks. If grassroots trade unionists and health workers effectively link up with the communities affected by cuts in a fight for a fully public, democratically controlled NHS then we have the power to drive the vultures out of our health service and save lives.

PICKET AGAINST HEALTH CUTS

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Capitalism: A Love Story

Next Article

Behind the Climate Change Scandals

Related Posts

Review: Is Red Plenty possible?

The planned economy and the struggle for socialism (first published in Socialism Today)

Red Plenty, by Francis Spufford, mixes fact and fiction to describe post-second world war Russia. The author sets out to expose Stalinist mismanagement and authoritarian rule – and, by extension, any notion of socialist planning. Inadvertently, however, he also shows the great potential of socialism – if it were truly run under the democratic control of the working class. PETER TAAFFE reviews this fascinating book.

Protest against cuts to services

EUROPEAN-WIDE WEEK OF PROTEST & SOLIDARITY - BELFAST PROTEST
NO CUTS TO PUBLIC SERVICES


Protest: 5-6pm Thursday 24 June
European Commission Office, 74-76 Dublin Rd, Belfast

ENDORSED BY: FIRE BRIGADES UNION - I.N.T.O. NORTHERN REGION - SOCIALIST PARTY - WORKERS PARTY - ORGANISE - SAVE MID-ULSTER HOSPITAL - WE WONT PAY CAMPAIGN - YOUTH AGAINST RACISM plus many others

NO CUTS TO BAILOUT THE BANKS - DEFEND JOBS, WAGES & SERVICES

For more information contact Gary Mulcahy on 07743282321

 

Lessons of Claudy

In July 1972 nine people were killed when three no-warning car bombs exploded in Claudy, a village just outside Derry City. July 1972 was the bloodiest month of the bloodiest year of the Troubles, but even then the Claudy attacks caused mass revulsion. Now a Police Ombudsman’s report into the bombs has implicated a deceased Catholic priest, Jim Chesney, in the attack. It has also alleged that the state and the Catholic hierarchy colluded to cover up his role.

Fermanagh flooding

Communities victims of Executive inaction

After six weeks of rain in which there were only two dry days, many parts of Fermanagh were under water in the early weeks of December. The county, which is divided diagonally by Upper and Lower Lough Erne, saw many of its tributary rivers burst their banks and flow over fields and roads criss-crossing the countryside. The lough itself rose from about 45.8 metres to 48.2 metres flooding large areas of farmland leaving families living on raised positions cut-off as water engulfed their access roads and made them impassable. My own great-aunt had to be evacuated as her home in Innisroosk was cut off once again making sense of a townland name signifying an island. Many other families suffered this experience as inadequate infrastructure failed in the face of exceptional rainfall.