Socialist Party exposes cuts in cardio-vascular surgery at RVH

FURTHER HEALTH CUTS REVEALED It can now be revealed that 6 more beds have been axed from cardio-vascular surgery services at the Royal Victoria Hospital, bringing recent bed losses in this unit to 12. West Belfast Socialist Party representative Pat Lawlor said these cuts will have a “serious impact on the standard of living of those waiting for surgery of this nature.”

Mr. Lawlor said: “The loss of these beds has led to elective surgery places being cut, with patients having treatment postponed and being pushed back onto the waiting list. These lists are already unacceptably long. This move will mean more stress and worry for patients and their loves ones, and could potentially lead to lives being lost. And this is just one example in a brutal swathe of attacks on health services in the Belfast Trust area, thanks to the Assembly’s agenda of cuts.”

“The Socialist Party has been campaigning against these cuts on the streets. We are hearing horror stories from health workers, and there is huge anger in the community on these issues. We’ll be doing our bit to help ordinary people fight back. Again, we call on Councillor Tom Hartley, who sits on the Belfast Trust’s Board of Directors, to explain why these cuts are necessary.”

Mr. Lawlor also refuted the Trust management’s suggestion that the closure of the Elliot Dynes Rehabilitation Unit would not have an impact on services to patients, stating: “There are currently 48 beds at Elliott Dynes, which is a purpose-built unit for rehabilitation. After its closure, there will only be 14 beds for this service, based on general wards without the necessary facilities. And there is no indication that any provision is being made for community-based services.  We challenge the Trust management to make public the details of any such provision. In reality, two-thirds of the service is being cut.”

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