Angry CWU telecoms members meet

CWU telecoms conference reflected the anger of members in the industry. Motions calling for changes to the attendance agreements that have been used to invoke the use of compulsory overtime were carried. Motions calling for pension increases to be linked to RPI and for changes to the ‘parking at home’ agreements, which are being used to force members to work extra hours, were also carried.  

The misnamed Left Activists Network-led executive showed its real colours in opposing a motion calling for the pay settlement for next year to attempt to rectify the losses incurred by members in the recent three-year pay deal. This gave a glimpse of how divorced from the membership they have become.

Conference overwhelmingly supported a motion calling for a campaign of opposition, including industrial action, on the issue of performance management which is being used to ‘manage’ people out of the business. The executive opposed the motion once again demonstrating their failure to grasp what is happening in the workplaces.

Members were enthused by this victory and left the conference determined to ensure that the telecoms executive leads a national campaign against bullying.

New members who attended the conference for the first time were enthused by the democratic debates at the broad left (BL) meetings and new members were recruited to the BL.

 

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