Sinn Fein offer the “same old failed strategy” for Job creation

Paddy Meehan, the Socialist Party’s South Belfast candidate, has challenged Alex Maskey to a public debate on Sinn Fein’s ‘job creation strategy’.

Responding to the Sinn Fein document, Paddy stated:

“Sinn Fein has simply outlined the same old failed strategy of tax breaks and subsidies for big business. It has not worked and it will not work now. Multinationals attracted by huge handouts from Invest NI will disappear as soon as the subsidies dry up. HCL – which received £5.5 million in public subsidies – is now threatening its workforce with the sack if they don’t accept huge attacks on their conditions.”

“Sinn Fein are hypocrites. The cuts they have signed up to will throw 40,000 people on the dole. Sinn Fein talk of ‘harmonising tax’ across Ireland- this means slashing corporation tax in the North, transferring millions directly from public services into the profits of big business.”

“The idea that the Assembly can come to an ‘agreement’ with the top banks to make them pay a ‘contribution’ to the recovery is insulting. These banks received over a £1 trillion of our money, and Sinn Fein wants them to pay a paltry £25 million a year. The Socialist Party says that the banks should be taken fully into public ownership and used to fund a program to create socially useful Jobs, such as investing in building new schools and hospitals, upgrading our water service and training new teachers and nurses.”

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AUSTERITY = UNEMPLOYMENT

Peacocks,D12,La Senza & Ulster Bank...

- Stop all public sector cuts! Make the super-rich pay!

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- Launch a public job creation scheme!

Socialist Party wins two Dail seats

 

The general election in Ireland was historic but not for the reasons being stressed by the would-be new government partners of Fine Gael and Labour. It is that true both parties achieved unprecedented successes at the polls but these are pyrrhic and temporary victories.

The election was historic mainly because it saw the near collapse of Fianna Fail, the dominant party of the capitalist establishment in Ireland since the foundation of the state and one of the most successful capitalist parties in Europe over the last eighty years. The election results are also extremely significant because it marked the emergence of the United Left Alliance, which won five seats.

The Socialist Party, who initiated the process that led to the formation of the United Left Alliance, got two TDs (members of the Dail – the Irish parliament) elected. Clare Daly was elected for the first time to the Dail in the Dublin North constituency (with 7,513 first preference votes or 15.2%). Joe Higgins was returned to the Dail representing Dublin West (8,084 or 19%). Both excellent results also represent the outlook of many working class people throughout the country, who see Socialist Party TDs as representatives of the working class generally not just for their particular constituencies.

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Cameron turns back clock on women’s rights

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The Tory leader told The Catholic Herald: "The way medical science and technology have developed in the past few decades does mean that an upper limit [on abortion] of 20 or 22 weeks would be sensible". The current law allows for an abortion up to 24 weeks of pregnancy.

Apparently, Cameron thinks he knows better than the medical and scientific experts who investigated the issue as recently as 2007 and concluded that there is no evidence that foetal viability has improved since the last time the upper limit was changed.