“Why I’m striking”

“I voted yes to strike action because I am very concerned about my pension in the future.

The government are proposing to increase our pension contributions and want us to work longer but are not increasing our pay or increments!

“I am also concerned about job security and cutbacks in the public sector, with the uncertainty of ESA approaching morale is at an all time low with staff shortages, threatened school closures and a freeze on vacancy control.

“NIPSA are fighting the fight for members’ rights and I feel it is important we show solidarity and I believe it imperative we stand up and show support on 30 November!

“For every person who supports the strike, it will shorten this dispute. All workers should strike. If we lose this dispute, we are doomed to a generation of misery, we must fight and we must win.”

Lesley-Ann Logan, Admin worker, Education Sector

 

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