Paying for the rich to party

Belfast City ratepayers are to pay £1,200 for booze for the Ulster Reform Club’s anniversary dinner. The Council has set the money aside for the clubs dinner in November.  

The Ulster Reform Club, whose website describes it as a ‘Gentleman’s Club’, is a private club for the richest businessmen. Admission to the club is by invitation only. Events /dinners cost up to £125!! Again, their website details their history – started by the capitalist elite – it supported unionism for 100 years. It only permitted women to join in the 1980’s!

Why are ratepayers paying for the richest in society to get pissed? This is a disgrace especially when government is trying to close or cut back local libraries, hospital wards and other services. We are constantly told there is no money to keep these services open so how come there is money for this? It shows how little the rich and their tame councillors have learnt from the MPs expenses scandal. They thought once the fuss from that had died down a bit they could start up their junkets again. We demand this offer to the super rich is withdrawn. We need city councillors who will represent the workers, not the rich!

 

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