Mistaken occupation of British Airways talks

The defeat of Willie Walsh and the brutish British Airways (BA) management is the most important aspect to this dispute. It is therefore unfortunate that the reported decision of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) members at the end of the Right to Work Conference to invade talks between British Airways management and Unite has partially obscured this issue.

This occupation was completely mistaken.Whatever the nature of the deal being negotiated it is not for a group like the SWP to decide to break up talks.

Cabin crew
A decision to accept or reject a deal is solely the property of cabin crew and their democratically elected representatives.

In an industrial dispute the final decision on tactics to confront the employer must always rest with the strikers themselves.

Socialists can assist by sharing experiences and ideas in past disputes and building support and solidarity for the strike among the general public.

This has always been the method of the Socialist Party. We will offer our opinion on the course of a dispute to workers but we believe that any initiative taken in support of a dispute should be taken in consultation with the workers themselves.

Key task
A key task for socialists and trade union activists is to raise the confidence of workers to fight not to substitute themselves for workers in struggle.

This will mistakenly create the impression that a special minority of activists will do the fighting leaving workers as bystanders.

The Socialist Party stands for the maximum control of workers over their dispute.

It is the view of the Socialist Party that the actions of the SWP on Saturday was not in the best interests of striking cabin crew workers.

Such tactics will prove to be counter-productive. It is the mass action of cabin crew through their union that is the key to defeating Walsh, not the actions of a self appointed minority.

Despite this we are totally opposed to any victimisation of those who mistakenly took part in this protest.

The priority for all workers in the trade union movement now is to support the cabin crew workers against Walsh and BA management.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

NI General Election - Fall of the Robinson Dynasty

Next Article

"They're all in this together" Fight their cutbacks

Related Posts

The Permanent Revolution today

We publish below a new introduction by Peter Taaffe to Leon Trotsky’s ‘Permanent Revolution’, which the comrades of Socialist Movement Pakistan (CWI) are to translate into Urdu and publish.

Introduction to new Urdu edition of ‘Permanent Revolution’ by Leon Trotsky

What relevance does Trotsky’s Theory of the Permanent Revolution have to the problems of the workers’ cause or the peasants’ (small farmers) movement today? After all, it was formulated more than 100 years ago during the first Russian revolution of 1905-07. The same kind of question could be posed – and it is – regarding the ideas of Marx and Engels, Lenin and Rosa Luxemburg. But no matter how ‘old’ is an idea – a method of analysis upon which mass action is based – if it more accurately describes the situation today than ‘new’ theories, it retains all its relevance in the modern era. This is particularly the case for the masses in the neo-colonial world – and especially today in the vital country of Pakistan with more than 200 million inhabitants – confronted as they are with all the terrible problems flowing from the incomplete capitalist-democratic revolution.

Anti-racist campaigner blasts draft legislation

New bill would have criminalised residents protesting against racist attacks on Romanian families last June

The draft ‘Public Assemblies’ Bill under discussion by the Assembly Executive has been branded a ‘disgrace’ by local anti-racist campaigner and South Belfast Socialist Party spokesperson Paddy Meehan.

Community campaign stops school closure

As reported in The Socialist (October 2009), grassroots campaigns have been growing to meet threats posed to the continued existence of rural schools throughout Fermanagh. The most developed of which established itself around the demand that St Mary’s Brollagh, a rural secondary school just outside Belleek, remain open.