Medical secretaries fight jobs & pay cuts

Medical secretaries in hospitals across the Belfast Health Trust are fighting against attempts to cut jobs and pay by £3,000 per year. As a result of the decision by the Assembly Executive to make cuts of £318million in health since last year, frontline services such as those carried out by medical secretaries are being decimated.

The Belfast Health Trust has announced they want to sack 50 medical secretaries – more than 10% in Belfast. In an effort to cut wages, they also announced plans to downgrade 120 medical secretaries from Band Four to either Band Three or Brand Two. One medical secretary working within a cancer centre summed up the impact these cuts will have “We are responsible for making sure all results from scans, biopsies etc are in the patient notes for the doctor to have to hand. As a secretary to 2 consultants I also deal with phone calls from patients, patient relatives, GPs and other hospitals. We are constantly under pressure. I very rarely take tea breaks and most days I work through my lunch to try and keep on top of my workload. Our department is already currently understaffed which means that when we take leave our work is not covered. It is not unknown for secretaries to work late into the evening (unpaid) in an effort to ensure typing is kept up to date. There is one word to describe my job- stressful!”

These proposals have been met with anger by medical secretaries, who fought a battle over years to achieve parity of pay with colleagues in England. Large protests have taken place outside the Royal, City, Mater and Ulster Hospitals and also outside the meeting of the Trust at Knockbracken. Members of NIPSA have also taken part in a consultative ballot, which resulted in the overwhelming majority of NIPSA members supporting strike action to stop the cuts. As a result, the Trust has been forced to concede that no existing medical secretaries on Band Four will downgraded. An agreement between the unions representing medical secretaries (NIPSA, Unison and Unite) and the Trust has been signed which also states that there are no proposals for compulsory redundancies. However, the threat to cut 50 posts via voluntary redundancies has not been removed. Neither has the Trust agreed that all new medical secretary positions will be on the same wages and conditions as existing medical secretaries. It is clear that the Trust is still determined to carry out the cuts as instructed by the Health Minister Michael McGimpsey. All the unions representing medical secretaries must co-ordinate united action of all medical secretaries in the Belfast Trust to stop plans to cut jobs and pay. Unless the Trust commits to protecting current posts and pay of incoming medical secretaries, ballots for action should be initiated in NIPSA, Unison and Unite.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Tony Blair’s destructive path

Next Article

Tory budget will hit women hardest

Related Posts

Youth revolt shakes political elite in Spain

The movement of May 15 in Spain has shaken the political elite to its core. Leaders and candidates of the main capitalist parties, PSOE and the PP are at a loss as to what to say. The media at first patronised the young people who occupied Puerta de Sol last week, labelling them the usual anti-capitalist suspects. Even as late as last Wednesday the Spanish press was in denial about the unfolding situation. Matías Prats, a leading newsreader raised his eyebrows when he read out the headlines on the ’Spanish Revolution’ from the foreign press as if to say, ’what do they know?’

CWU ballots BT workers for strike over pay

The CWU is set to ballot its members in BT for industrial action over pay for the first time since 1987.

Last year the union recommended its members accepted only a £400 non consolidated payment and reductions in pension benefits because the company pleaded poverty after making its first loss since the 1970s.