International Round-up

  • Egypt: Biggest demonstrations for 30 years stuns Mubarak’s repressive regime
  • Lebanon: Hezbollah-backed candidate appointed new prime minister
  • Tunisia: ’Caravans’ of the revolution converge on Tunis
  • Israel: ’Haifa Chemicals’ workers’ demonstration
  • China: Another suicide at Foxconn

 

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Peter Hadden’s writings online at Marxist Internet Archive

Socialist writings on Ireland and the national question

Peter Hadden, who served for many years on the Socialist Party National Executive Committee and held the post of Northern Secretary, as well as on the CWI’s International Executive Committee, sadly died last May. 2011 sees the welcome development of Peter’s many articles and pamphlets being posted on the Marxists Internet Archive (MIA - www.marxists.org) a widely-read site which makes accessible the works of a large variety of Marxist writings. 

Cameron turns back clock on women’s rights

David Cameron's comments on abortion last week underlined the danger of increased attacks on women's rights if the Tories win the general election.

The Tory leader told The Catholic Herald: "The way medical science and technology have developed in the past few decades does mean that an upper limit [on abortion] of 20 or 22 weeks would be sensible". The current law allows for an abortion up to 24 weeks of pregnancy.

Apparently, Cameron thinks he knows better than the medical and scientific experts who investigated the issue as recently as 2007 and concluded that there is no evidence that foetal viability has improved since the last time the upper limit was changed.

Biggest demonstrations for 30 years stuns Mubarak’s repressive regime

The biggest demonstrations against the Egyptian government in over 30 years have stunned President Hosni Mubarak’s repressive regime. The demonstrations were called on Police Day, January 25, a national holiday that marks the 1952 struggle by the Ismailia police against the British Occupation. Mubarak’s police force today is the very opposite of a liberation movement! It is used to violently prevent workers and youth from demonstrating their anger against the corrupt and fabulously wealthy ruling elite. 

August 1969

When British troops went in to Northern Ireland

August 1969 was a turning point in the history of Northern Ireland. It was then that the Labour Government of Harold Wilson took the decision to send troops onto the streets, first of Derry, then of Belfast.

The measure was presented as temporary – troops were needed, they said,  because, with riots sweeping the streets, with huge parts of Derry and Belfast sealed off behind barricades and with pogroms starting to develop, it was clear that the Unionist government at Stormont had lost control. It was to be a ‘stop gap’. The troops would be withdrawn ‘as soon as law and order is restored’.