InDepth – Northern Ireland

Assembly parties deliver cuts and sectarianism

After the general election and the looming cuts facing Northern Ireland these series of articles bring together the Socialist Party’s analysis of what is happening both inside and outside the Assembly.

They also deal with the character of the dissident groups and the dangers of increasing sectarianism in society.

Some these articles also point to the massive attacks on the public sector being implemented with the consent of all the Executive parties and the prospect for united struggles of workers and young people.

Dissident republicans – Nothing to offer but a return to sectarian killings
By Gary Mulcahy, 30th August 2010

Riots expose reality of sectarianism – Working class needs its own party
By Ciaran Mulholland, 26th July 2010

Bloody Sunday Saville Inquiry – Innocent protesters murdered by the British Army
By Gary Mulcahy, 17th June 2010

Dissident republicanism – Nothing to offer but a return to sectarian killings
By Gary Mulcahy, 5th June 2010

“They’re all in this together” Fight their cutbacks
By Owen McCracken, 26th May 2010

NI General Election – Fall of the Robinson Dynasty
By Gary Mulcahy, 24th May 2010

Northern Ireland: New party needed for working class
By Gary Mulcahy, 13th April 2010

Northern Ireland – Assembly parties deliver cuts & sectarianism
By Gary Mulcahy, 2nd November 2009

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