Housing Executive told “No more privatisation”

After termination of Red Sky contract, Housing Executive told “No more privatisation”

The decision of the Housing Executive to terminate a major contract with the construction company Red Sky after allegations of overcharging is proof that “private sector involvement in the running of public services is a waste of money and leads to inefficient and worse services” according to the Socialist Party.

Pat Lawlor, candidate for the Socialist Party in West Belfast stated

“Residents have been telling the Housing Executive and Margaret Richie and Alex Atwood, the two Ministers responsible for housing in the last Assembly, that privatisation of the service has been a disaster for years. It comes as no surprise that allegations of overcharging have emerged. Private companies don’t care about providing a service – all they care about is making as much money as possible from the taxpayer.

“I challenge all the main parties to commit that in the event that they will take the Minister for Social Development in the next Assembly that they do not outsource this service to the private sector.

Tommy Black, East Belfast candidate for the Socialist Party added

“The jobs at Red Sky should be defended. Red Sky may move to cut jobs as a result of losing the Housing Executive contract. In order to save jobs, the Minister for Social Development should instruct the Housing Executive to employ these workers to provide housing maintenance as a public service – not to make a profit for company bosses. 

“The question of the future of Red Sky must also be considered. If as a result of a reliance on public sector contracts the company moves to shed jobs, the Assembly Executive should bring the company into public ownership and run democratically by the workers, community representatives and elected representatives.”

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