Housing bosses on + £100,000 salary

Housing maintenance grant budgets are being cut. Major investment in social housing is urgently needed to meet the housing needs of ordinary people. We are told there is not enough dough to go round. Well, if you happen to be a boss of housing associations, there is plenty to go round.

It has been revealed that seven housing associations, notorious for raising rents, pay their chief executives more than £100,000 a year! The combined chief executive salary budget across all housing associations in Northern Ireland stands over £2million. This does not include bonuses and the provision of expensive BMW’s and Audi’s. But they don’t need to worry, the Minister for Social Development Alex Attwood has said he will deal with this by proposing a “voluntary” pay cut for top earners – that will get ‘em shakin in their boots for sure Alex!

 

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The struggle for socialism today

A reply to the politics of the Socialist Workers Party

A 1999 document by the Socialist Party in Ireland
Introduction by Tom Crean

This pamphlet, written in the form of an open letter, originated in correspondence between the Socialist Party in Ireland and the Socialist Workers Party [in Ireland - Ed], initiated by the latter. The SWP approached us with a view to having a bloc in the recent local elections. While we were willing to discuss this, we had severe reservations about the positions and methods of the SWP which we wished to discuss before considering an agreement.