Health Cuts Exposed

Assembly cuts responsible for closure of Unit at the Royal Hospitals It can be exclusively revealed that the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust has imminent plans to close the Elliot Dynes Regional Rehabilitation Centre at the Royal Hospitals. Pat Lawlor, West Belfast Socialist Party representative, described the move as “part of a series of stealth attacks on the health service”.

 

Mr Lawlor added “Elliot Dynes is a unique unit, which provides rehabilitation to mainly older patients who have suffered serious debilitating conditions such as strokes. The decision to close the centre is outrageous and will have a devastating impact on the recovery necessary by the people in need of these services, many of whom are extremely vulnerable”.

“Staff at the unit have been left in limbo, and there is a lot of anger at this move. Workers feel they may be forced to transfer anywhere in the Belfast Trust or face losing their job.”

“Ominously this is just the tip of the iceberg. Thanks to the Assembly Executive’s programme of slashing public spending, cuts are already taking place across the Belfast Trust with dire consequences for staff and patients. And if the main parties get their way, there is much worse to come. I would also like to challenge Councillor Tom Hartley, who receives £5-10k per year as a member of the board of the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, to publically justify these cuts.”

The Socialist Party is campaigning to raise public awareness of these cuts and to mobilise staff and the local community against attacks on the health service in the coming months.

 

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Billions stolen in unpaid wages

Next Article

Troubled Times - The national question in Ireland

Related Posts

South Africa wins the World Cup … of inequality

Let them eat cake - the ugly backdrop to the beautiful game

Nothing symbolises more graphically the ugliness that forms the backdrop to the beautiful game than all the scandals, corruption and greed surrounding the mega event on which the entire world’s media is focused – the 2010 World Cup. The first to be held on the African continent, it is being presented as an opportunity to contribute to the development of sport and the economy. Through amongst others, “football Fridays” (when the national anthem should be sung by all and the national football jersey worn), and the special “diski” World Cup dance, it will brighten up the fading colours of the “Rainbow Nation”, boost “nation building”, provide redress for historical injustices, create jobs and help SA escape the effects of the global recession and kickstart economic recovery – a panacea for all social and economic ills.

BT pay deal – “We still feel like we deserve more”

TheSocialist spoke to a worker in BT’s Customer Service contact centre after the recent 9.3% pay deal over three and half years - the equivalent to nearly 3% each year.

“With inflation in August running at 4.7% and VAT set to hit 20% in January, this pay deal will not match inflation and is in effect a pay cut. We still feel like we deserve more. For someone on A1 (the lowest pay band in BT) who earns £14,197 a year before any deductions, it is getting very difficult to pay the bills. The new pay deal isn’t going to cover it. Yet BT has reported massive pre-tax profits of £1billion so far this year!

Greece: Savage austerity policies passed despite mass protest

Tear gas and police brutality against general strikes and movement of the Enraged
 Deploying tear gas and threats, the Greek Pasok government passed new austerity policies during a protest 48 hour general strike and the movement of the ‘Enraged’. Tens of thousands went on to the streets of Athens on 28 June during trade union demonstrations to Syntagma Square, next to the parliament buildings. During the evening, around 50,000 attended a ‘rebellion’ concert. On Wednesday 29 June, tens of thousands came together in the centre of Athens to show their anger. The trade union confederations called for a 48 hour general strike. The support was solid. Public transport – except the metro, which was asked to transport people to the demonstrations – came to a halt and the public sector participation was overwhelming.

Bank bosses making the workers pay

The announcement of massive job cuts in the banking sector further underlines that the bank bailouts had nothing to do with defending the interest of working class people.

Lloyds TSB has planned to cut up to 5,000 jobs across the UK. Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) plans to cut 3,700 jobs on top of the 16,000 jobs it has already axed. HSBC, who announced that its third quarter profits were "significantly ahead" of last year, will cut a further 1,700 jobs meaning 3,400 job lost since December. In Ireland, Ulster Bank which is owed by RBS had axed 1,000 jobs this year and now wants to cap pensionable salary, reduce pay and seriously undermine conditions of employment.