EXCLUSIVE: Plans to close Woodstock library leaked

Tommy Black calls for immediate statement from Libraries NI over future of Woodstock Library Concerned library staff have informed Socialist Party campaigner Tommy Black that management have announced plans to close Woodstock Library in East Belfast only weeks after Libraries NI chief executive Irene Knox announced it would “remain open”.

According to Mr Black “Library staff feel unable to publically speak out against these plans due to management threats.

Libraries NI carried out a sham consultation before announcing the closure of ten libraries across Belfast. It now appears they are not happy with this – they want to close down even more. I am demanding an immediate statement from Irene Knox stating that there are no plans to close Woodstock Library. If this is not forthcoming, we will be left with no choice but to launch a major community campaign to save Woodstock Library.”

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