Elections – Socialist Party to stand in General Election

The Socialist Party is to stand candidates in the upcoming general election in the South Belfast and the East Belfast constituencies and is considering running in other constituencies in order to provide working class people a real reason to go and vote.

All the parties in the Executive share the same right-wing economic agenda. They are all pursuing cuts to services, jobs, privatisation and planning to introduce water charges. They continue to bail-out big business by awarding multi-million PFI contracts, while they claim there is not enough money to fund services or to pay decent wages.

There is no opposition within the Assembly to these policies. The Socialist Party is standing in the upcoming elections to provide a genuine alternative to the pro-rich policies of the Executive parties.

The Socialist Party has played a key role in campaigning against the introduction of water charges through the building of the We Won’t Pay Campaign. This campaign has succeeded in forcing the British government and the Assembly into deferring water charges for over four years, saving thousands of pounds. If it wasn’t for this campaign, water charges would most likely have been introduced by now. We want to build a socialist opposition to the policies of the main parties and uniting working class communities across the sectarian divide.

Unlike most of the politicians in Stormont, if elected Socialist Party candidates will pledge to live on a workers’ wage, not on the massive salaries many Ministers are living on. As Joe Higgins who represented working class people in the Dail in the South or like socialist MP’s Dave Nellist and Terry Fields in Britain in the past, Socialist Party candidates are not standing to carve out a cosy career. It is essential that working class people have elected representatives who can use their positions to highlight and campaign in the workers interests.

So if you’re tired of giving off about useless sectarian politicians who are out of touch with ordinary people and want to shake up the political establishment, get in touch with us to help out with our campaigning work and assist us in building a socialist alternative which can speak for working class people. Tel: 02890232962

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