Dave Nellist on the Trade Union and Socialist Coalition

The Trade Union and Socialist Coalition was founded by the Socialist Party sister sections in England, Wales and Scotland as well as the Rail, Maritime and Transport workers union (RMT) and a number of other political groups.

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80th anniversary of the Wall Street Crash

 

 

Capitalist failure, then and now!


Peter Taaffe, General Secretary of the Socialist Party (CWI England and Wales)

Scant attention has been paid to the 80th anniversary of the October 1929 Wall Street Crash. Preoccupied with their own present devastating global crisis, the moneybags, the capitalists, can hardly repeat their theme of yesterday – “it can never happen again” – when dealing with 1929. How much of it really has happened again? And what are the underlying causes of today’s crisis?

 

 

After the Omagh Bomb

October 1998

AN UNPRECEDENTED wave of anger and revulsion has swept across Northern Ireland in the aftermath of the Omagh bomb. In Omagh virtually everything shut down for a week as the town braced itself for the agony of the funerals.

On the Monday morning shop stewards approached the management of the Desmonds factory, one of the biggest employers in the town, and the result was the closure of the factory for a week. In the town centre only newsagents and florists stayed open. A vigil organised by local community activists on Tuesday evening, and held in a car park close to where the bomb went off, drew a huge crowd.

France – Sarkozy’s policies massively rejected in regional elections

’Third round on the streets’ - Big gains for Socialist Party and allies, and also for far right, but new Anti-capitalist Party in disarray

Little more than 24 hours after the second round of regional elections in France, strike action began on the railways, ushering in a day of action and protests in 80 cities across the country. March 23 was agreed on by the eight major trade union organisations to demonstrate mounting hostility to the government’s policies on jobs, pensions, working conditions and the cost of living. Mobilisation from on top was poor, but anger and hatred against Sarkozy has reached boiling point. He and his government have pushed ahead with attacks on the railway workers, universities, high schools, post office etc. Only in some cases, where widespread opposition has developed, has he been forced to step back.