Capita: 84 more jobs lost

Just days after announcing annual profits of £357million, Capita is set to sack another 84 workers in Belfast. Capita, which has major contracts with the NI civil service and the BBC, once employed 450 workers, but after this latest round of job losses, only 75 will remain at its base in Clarendon Dock.

The NI Executive’s privatisation policies have boosted Capita’s profits. In 2009, Minister for Education, Caitriona Ruane, outsourced the teachers’ pensions payroll and administration service to Capita at a cost of £2.5 million. The result has seen the loss of hundreds of jobs. The Executive should immediately terminate all public sector contracts with Capita and bring all these services back into the public sector to create jobs.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

Fujitsu: ACAS proposals accepted

Next Article

Youth Fight for Jobs tells Minister, "We demand jobs not excuses!"

Related Posts

The struggle for socialism today

A reply to the politics of the Socialist Workers Party

A 1999 document by the Socialist Party in Ireland
Introduction by Tom Crean

This pamphlet, written in the form of an open letter, originated in correspondence between the Socialist Party in Ireland and the Socialist Workers Party [in Ireland - Ed], initiated by the latter. The SWP approached us with a view to having a bloc in the recent local elections. While we were willing to discuss this, we had severe reservations about the positions and methods of the SWP which we wished to discuss before considering an agreement.

Postal workers vote for strike action


120,000 postal workers throughout Britain and Northern Ireland have been balloted for strike action. Gabriel McCurry, Chair of the Communication Workers Union (CWU) NI Combined Branch spoke to Gary Mulcahy about the issues behind the ballot.

Fermanagh flooding

Communities victims of Executive inaction

After six weeks of rain in which there were only two dry days, many parts of Fermanagh were under water in the early weeks of December. The county, which is divided diagonally by Upper and Lower Lough Erne, saw many of its tributary rivers burst their banks and flow over fields and roads criss-crossing the countryside. The lough itself rose from about 45.8 metres to 48.2 metres flooding large areas of farmland leaving families living on raised positions cut-off as water engulfed their access roads and made them impassable. My own great-aunt had to be evacuated as her home in Innisroosk was cut off once again making sense of a townland name signifying an island. Many other families suffered this experience as inadequate infrastructure failed in the face of exceptional rainfall.