Ballynahinch I CAN centre needs long-term funding

The I CAN Centre in Ballynahinch has again been threatened with closure and thrust into another period of uncertainty by the South Eastern Education and Library Board in this first round of savage cuts across education.

Families of children with speech and language difficulties who attend the I CAN Early Years Centre now find themselves forced to fight for the very right to have their children provided with intensive speech and language therapy in their pre-school years. This is the time when huge improvements can actually be made. The closure of this centre will take away from children who are dependent on this vital service, the ability to communicate and interact with family and peers, enabling a child to enjoy the same quality of life as other children have and should have in their school years. The taking away of this service from families is a denial of basic rights. There must be a community based campaign, uniting parents, children, staff and the general public. A strong campaign can force the Education Minister Caitriona Ruane to give the paltry sum of £85,000 per annum which is required to keep this centre open. That is even less than the SEELB Chief Executive’s annual salary – to fund a centre to teach 20 children!

It is important that such a campaign also demands long-term funding to meet children’s and staff’s needs, as opposed to the year on year threat of closing due to a lack of funding. Given Ruane’s track-record in attacking the pay, terms and conditions of classroom assistants in the past, parents cannot afford to rely on the Minister’s decency or sense of fair-play. It will require a fighting campaign to secure the long-term funding needed to maintain this vital service.

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

CWU ballots BT workers for strike over pay

Next Article

Bloody Sunday Saville Inquiry - Innocent protesters murdered by the British Army

Related Posts

France – Sarkozy’s policies massively rejected in regional elections

’Third round on the streets’ - Big gains for Socialist Party and allies, and also for far right, but new Anti-capitalist Party in disarray

Little more than 24 hours after the second round of regional elections in France, strike action began on the railways, ushering in a day of action and protests in 80 cities across the country. March 23 was agreed on by the eight major trade union organisations to demonstrate mounting hostility to the government’s policies on jobs, pensions, working conditions and the cost of living. Mobilisation from on top was poor, but anger and hatred against Sarkozy has reached boiling point. He and his government have pushed ahead with attacks on the railway workers, universities, high schools, post office etc. Only in some cases, where widespread opposition has developed, has he been forced to step back.