Sudan: Revolutionary struggle can end military rule

President Amdala Hamdok, the face of the civilian component of a military-run government in Sudan, who has falsely promised to guide the country’s “transition to democracy”, resigned on 2 January. He claims the ongoing political stalemate between the civilian and military components of the government since the military coup of October 25, 2021, led to his decision.

By Eva Martin

President Amdala Hamdok, the face of the civilian component of a military-run government in Sudan, who has falsely promised to guide the country’s “transition to democracy”, resigned on 2 January. He claims the ongoing political stalemate between the civilian and military components of the government since the military coup of October 25, 2021, led to his decision. 

Freedom, peace and justice

His resignation did not result from the considerations for what the working people on the street want and have been demanding since 2019, namely: ‘no negotiation, no partnership, no legitimacy for the military.’ The decision has had minimal impact on the revolutionary mood on the ground. The economy is becoming ever more crippled with rampant inflation, policies of austerity, and the suspension of international foreign aid has left the masses of Sudanese people in a desperate situation.

The working people of Sudan want real democracy that actually provides them with the demands of the uprising: freedom, peace, and justice. This is impossible to achieve under the regime of the Sudanese capitalist state. After the massacre of June 2019 by the state forces, and hundreds of people protesting against the military’s brutal repression, the major capitalist powers validated and recognised the power of the military government. They rewarded it for its massacre. 

Furthermore, the military clique has enormous ownership and control over the economy. The civilian faction of the government was also entirely dependent on financial support from capitalist powers, but of course, support came on the condition that the government implement grotesque austerity policies, which only worsened an already dire situation for the Sudanese people. 

Winning real change

The current regime and its backers does not, and cannot, serve the interests of the people of Sudan. Whilst Sudan’s military government continues to promote repression and austerity, the people of Sudan are not fooled nor defeated. They have pledged that mass protests to win their demands will continue. 

There is a real connection between the suffering and oppression of the Sudanese people and the capitalist system that the Sudanese government defends. The fight for democracy in Sudan is bound up with a revolutionary socialist struggle to seize its wealth and resources from the hands of the military and capitalist class and ensure it is utilised for the benefit of the masses.

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