Support PCS Home Office group in battle against cuts

PCS and the Home Office group in particular are being viciously attacked in relation to their possible strike this week.

 

The Guardian on Friday reported a conversation between government minister Jeremy Hunt and BBC interviewer Garry Richardson.

 

Hunt told Richardson on Radio 5 Live’s Sportsweek: “Sack them? That is the Ronald Reagan approach” in a reference to the former US president’s decision to dismiss more than 11,000 air traffic controllers for being a peril to national safety.

 

“I can tell you amongst ministers there have been people asking whether we should be doing that, but I don’t want to escalate things by talking about that right now, because I know amongst those 600 people there are lots of people who want to do the right thing and turn up for work” he added.

 

Richardson had drawn the comments by asking: “It’s great that you have got these contingency plans and you have got these people able to come in and you have trained them up to step in.

 

“Why not just let those people go on strike and when they want to come back after they have done all their disruption say ‘sorry, your job’s not there any more’? Sack them.”

 

Earlier, he said of the workers: “They are a disgrace, aren’t they?”.

 

Guardian last Friday: www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/jul/20/

 

and Monday: www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jul/22/

 

Please send messages of support to solidarity@pcs.org.uk

Also send complaints to the Guardian: letters@guardian.co.uk and the BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/complaints/complain-online/

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