Belfast International Women’s Day: Stand up, fight back!

People of all genders took to the streets of Belfast City Centre on Saturday 4 March to come together and celebrate International Women’s Day. The rally included, for the first time since 2020, a march from Writers Square to City Hall.

By Anya Duxbury

People of all genders took to the streets of Belfast City Centre on Saturday 4 March to come together and celebrate International Women’s Day. The rally included, for the first time since 2020, a march from Writers Square to City Hall. The posters and banners were accompanied by shouting and screaming, chants and cheers, proclaiming that when women’s rights, trans rights and migrants’ rights are under attack, we will all “Stand Up and Fight Back!” The return of the march was a cause for celebration, with a fantastic turnout and crowds of shoppers stopping to watch or even join in. 

Whilst it was a joyful event, there was both sadness and anger at the lack of change and women’s lives lost since the last rally. It was especially powerful to see Natalie McNally’s family in attendance, standing proud at the front of the crowd. The speakers were inspiring, with the crowd loudly showing support for migrant mothers, the rights of disabled women, Women’s Aid, and the Regina Coeli house. Whilst there was a transphobic comment made by one of the speakers, the crowd immediately rallied, and a powerful show of support and solidarity for the trans community followed. The trans flag was held high and an ABBA soundtrack set the scene for a final dance party in the crowd. 

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

The same struggle – unite against gender violence, racism and the far-right

Next Article

Hyper exploitation and profiteering - the reality of "fast fashion"

Related Posts
Read More

100 years after suffrage: Lessons for women’s struggles today

This year marks the centenary of the first women in Britain and Ireland winning the right to vote in parliamentary elections. The political establishment and right-wing propaganda have been celebrating the introduction of the 1918 Representation of the People Act. But it cannot be forgotten that this Act was a deeply classist compromise, and aimed only to enfranchise a small number of property-owning women from the privileged elite in society, whilst simultaneously ignoring millions of ordinary working-class women.
Read More

Rosa Luxemburg @ 150: an historic inspiration

In January 1919, after a failed uprising led by the newly-formed German Communist Party, Rosa Luxemburg refused to leave Berlin despite the real threats against her; she didn’t want to leave her fellow workers who were experiencing counter-revolutionary repression. The Freikorps (paramilitary units) were sent to remove the ‘head of the beast’ - the revolutionary masses - by executing their influential leaders, including Luxemburg.