Unite against racist attacks

tommy windSpeaking on the latest in a series of racist attacks in East Belfast Tommy Black, Socialist Party representative stated

” There is no support amongst the vast majority of people in East Belfast for the racist attacks we have witnessed over recent days. This latest attack in the My Ladys road area involving a crowd armed with golf clubs is particularly sickening. Residents, community activists and trade unionists must unite and send a clear message to these thugs that Racism is not welcome in our area”

He added “It is the cuts and privatisation coming from Stormount that is fuelling the crisis in social housing, and is the real cause of the increasing poverty and deprivation in our community. We need jobs and homes in East Belfast, not racism”

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

O'Cofaigh challenges candidates to public debate on fracking

Next Article

Where's our recovery?

Related Posts

Michael Foot – the end of an era

Many "Old Labour" workers and socialists will be saddened at the death of Michael Foot and will see it as signifying the death of an era.

However the ideas of Michael Foot - of piecemeal socialist reform of society through successive 'progressive' Labour governments - died long before he physically passed away on 3 March.

 

Read More

The Battle of Cable Street: Lessons for combatting the far right

84 years ago today, on 4th October 1936, Communists and socialists came together with Jewish and Irish workers in an historic stand to stop Oswald Mosley and several thousand of his fascist Blackshirts from marching through the East End of London. In what became known as The Battle of Cable Street, Mosley and his thugs, with police protection, were blocked by an estimated 300,000 counter-protesters across east London.

Read More

Campbell’s bigoted comments & the racism at the heart of the system

DUP MP Gregory Campbell is still refusing to apologise for racist remarks that he made over a recent episode of Songs of Praise. The episode in question, the final of the competition for Gospel Singer of the Year, was performed and judged by an entirely black cast of musicians – fitting for a genre which originated in black churches in the US from the descendants of slaves who adopted Christianity when their own religious beliefs were forcibly suppressed.